The Link Between Thyroid and Cholesterol

The Link Between Thyroid and Cholesterol

Welcome to Regenerate You, I’m Dr. Nirvana!

Thyroid problems can have a ripple effect throughout your body, including your cardiovascular system. In particular, people with hypothyroidism may have higher cholesterol, which can increase the risk of heart disease and further inflammatory conditions in the body. On this episode I discuss the link between thryoid issues and cardivascular disease and what you need to know about this potential danger.

If you’re looking for additional advice, feel free to visit my blog here. You can also stay connected with me on my Facebook page @DrNirvanaHeals or on my Instagram @DrNirvana.

Please remember to subscribe and to share this Podcast!

 

And remember, when you regenerate, there’s a new you every day!

The Link Between Food Intolerance, Hormones and Your Gut Health

The Link Between Food Intolerance, Hormones and Your Gut Health

Welcome to Regenerate You!

If you find yourself struggling with food intolerances of any kind, then it’s most likely causing an imbalance in your hormones as well. And if you’ve been diagnosed with low testosterone, PCOSestrogen dominancethyroid issues, or insulin resistance; then your food sensitivities are making them worse.

In this Podcast, I discuss how they’re linked and where to begin to help heal and regenerate your body from the attack on your immune system.

If you’re looking for additional advice, feel free to visit my blog here. You can also stay connected with me on my Facebook page @DrNirvanaHeals or on my Instagram @DrNirvana.

Please subscribe and share this podcast to spread the health.

 

And remember, when you regenerate, there’s a new you every day!

Understanding your Thyroid Labs

Understanding your Thyroid Labs

Decoding Thyroid Lab Values

Understanding what type of thyroid condition seems to be a common question I receive. One of the questions I am most frequently asked is, “what are the most important thyroid function tests to check to assess your thyroid’s function?” The appropriate tests, along with what your thyroid lab results really mean, are two of the essential topics to understand…to determine if you genuinely have thyroid dysfunction or not. So I thought I’d put together this reference guide to help. With this table in mind, let’s discuss what each lab test means.

 

TSH

TSH tests pituitary function and can be used to diagnose thyroid disease.

  • If TSH is high – this can be a sign that you are under-producing thyroid hormones and you are hypothyroid
  • If TSH is low – this can be a sign that you are over-producing thyroid hormones and are hyperthyroid, or that you are on too much supplemental thyroid hormone. Supplemental T3 or natural desiccated thyroid hormone with T3 can artificially suppress your TSH, so in the absence of symptoms, it could be perfectly normal.
  • If your TSH is ‘normal’ – for example your TSH falls within the normal reference range, this could indicate that you do not have thyroid dysfunction. However, “normal” and “optimal” levels have two very different meanings. So, if you still have symptoms and are in the “normal” — not “optimal” — range then you likely could have thyroid dysfunction

 

Free T3

Free T3 may be the most important measure of thyroid function in the serum because it measures the free and active thyroid hormone. T3 is more biologically active than T4.

  • If FT3 is high – indicates that your thyroid is overactive or hyperthyroidism
  • If FT3 is low – you may not be converting T4 to FT3 very well and you could have hypothyroid symptoms even if your TSH and FT4 are within range. This is one of the most common causes of low thyroid or hypothyroidism I see in my practice.

 

Free T4

Free T4 measures the amount of free T4 in circulation. Once TSH signals to your thyroid to ramp up the production of its hormones, it produces the four different types of thyroid hormone – T1, T2, T3, and T4. The primary output of your thyroid is T4, which is a storage form of the hormone. It is circulated throughout the bloodstream and stored in tissues so that it’s available when needed. I liked to measure Free T4 (FT4) since it is unbound and able to act in the body.

  • If FT4 is high – it can indicate an overactive thyroid or hyperthyroidism
  • If FT4 is low – it can indicate an underactive thyroid or hypothyroidism

 

Total T3

Total T3 includes measurement of bound T3. Bound T3 is not considered active like free T3 but total T3 gives you a more stable long-term marker of T3 in circulation.

 

Thyroid Antibodies

The thyroid antibodies include thyroglobulin antibody, thyroid peroxidase antibody and thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin. The presence of these antibodies in your serum may indicate an autoimmune disease which is damaging your thyroid gland. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) attack an enzyme used to synthesize thyroid hormones and are commonly elevated in both Hashimoto’s and Graves’ Disease patients. Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb), attack thyroglobulin, which your thyroid uses to produce its hormones. These are typically elevated in Hashimoto’s patients.

  • If your antibodies are elevated – your immune system is attacking your thyroid and you have autoimmune thyroid disease, or you are on the autoimmune spectrum.

 

Reverse T3

Reverse T3 helps measure the conversion capacity of your thyroid gland. Your body also uses a portion of the T4 to create Reverse T3 (RT3), another inactive form of thyroid hormone. RT3 can attach to the receptors for Free T3 to slow down your metabolic processes.

  • If RT3 is high – you are likely converting too much T4 to RT3 and not enough to FT3, which can cause hypothyroid symptoms even if your TSH and T4 levels are optimal. In addition, I look at something called the RT3/FT3 ratio. I like that to be less than a 10:1 ratio.

 

 

What you Should have Checked

Most conventional medicine doctors only check your Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) levels. If you are lucky, they will test your Free T4 levels to see if you are low on the storage form of thyroid hormones. However, as we’ve just covered, there are many factors involved in optimal thyroid function, so those two levels alone don’t tell the whole story. To get a complete picture of a patient’s thyroid health and medication needs, I recommend ordering all of the thyroid tests listed below:

  • TSH
  • Free T4
  • Free T3
  • Reverse T3
  • Thyroid Peroxidase Antibodies (TPOAb)
  • Thyroglobulin Antibodies (TgAb)

 

Optimal Thyroid Lab Ranges

In my Practice, I have found that the ranges below are the ones in which my patients thrive. I listen to my patients as well and take how they are feeling into account.

  • TSH 1-2 UIU/ML or lower (Armour or compounded T3 can artificially suppress TSH)
  • FT4 >1.1 NG/DL
  • FT3 > 3.2 PG/ML
  • RT3 less than a 10:1 ratio RT3:FT3
  • TPO – TgAb – < 4 IU/ML or negative

 

Being educated about what’s going on with your thyroid will help you make the best choices when determing the next step in taggling your thyroid questions!

 

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The Difference Between Oral and IV Vitamins

How IV Therapy Benefits You More Thank Oral Supplementation

What if there was one thing in your body that had the power to control the way you look, feel and think? And what if supporting this one thing was the key to unlocking everlasting health? Sound too good to be true? I’m here to tell you that not only is this a fact, but it’s this vital organ in your body that serves as a common denominator for most of today’s health problems. I’m referring to your gut.

The current Merck Manual lists 14 main gastrointestinal disorders, with up to 14 subdivisions within each of the principle groupings (Beers, 2006). Add to this the finding that many other disease states affect the gastrointestinal tract significantly, and both give us a strong reminder that our gut has a major influence on our health. Intravenous (IV) therapy can be a useful adjunct to the oral treatment of gastrointestinal diseases.

This is because by the time symptoms of disease have made their appearance, it is sometimes too late for oral vitamins and minerals to make much difference. Nevertheless, these same vitamins and minerals, given intramuscularly (IM) or intravenously, can benefit many diseases. We know that the health of the GI tract affects the overall health of all body functions and the well-being of every individual. We approach the problem of disease as a problem of the cell. What the cell needs to be maximally healthy is always found in nature. However, to be effective, these nutrients must be admitted into the cell.

When given in high concentration, IV or IM nutrients enter the cell by sheer force of numbers. Administering nutrients in a concentration great enough to force those nutrients into the cell by means of a high-concentration gradient as well as the ability of the cell wall to absorb them, is highly beneficial. Highly concentrated on the outside, the cell membrane is semi-permeable meaning that it admits the nutrients into the cell due to the high-concentration gradient that was created.

The only way to obtain this high concentration is by IV or IM administration. With the GI cells, the IV route is especially useful for this purpose, because it’s immediately absorbed. When oral absorption is not effective, the parenteral route proves to be the most effective option.

So if you find yourself suffering from any GI issues (gas, bloating, acid-reflux), hormone imbalances, hypothyroidism, menopause, Hashimotos, or even trying to prevent the common cold; an IV would be the best option for you. And for every one of my patients, I custom-make each and every IV, so that you get exactly what you need. No cookie cutter recipes in my office!

The Most Important Vitamin for Your Thyroid

The Most Important Vitamin for Your Thyroid

Protecting Your Thyroid

The Most Essential Vitamin for Your Thyroid

 

Your Thyroid Releases Toxins

During the production of thyroid hormones (T4 & T3), a large amount of free radicals are normally produced as well. The free radicals are toxic and must be eliminated as soon as possible in order to prevent the negative effects if they’re accumulated.

 

Your MUST – Have Antioxidant

This is where my very most favorite antioxidant, widely known as the “mother of all antioxidants” aka Glutathione, comes in handy. When Glutathione is present in appropriate levels in your body, it’s able to address the free radiacal damage and solve it in a matter of minutes, preventing any negative effects from occurring. However, if your body is struggling with Glutathione deficiency, the free radicals will accumulate causing an imbalance in the thyroid and soon in your overall health as well.

But that is not all….If your immune system is, for any reason, compromised, it can cause an imbalance in the Th1/Th2 system, causing it to attack its very own healthy body tissues. This will ultimately result in autoimmune disease.

This might be the first time that you are hearing about the importance of Glutathione, but if you’re interested in keeping your thyroid gland (and your immunity) in the best shape ever, you’ll want to incorporate this into your lifestyle as if it’s your BFF!

I uses it for so many different areas of my Practice such as:

 

Increasing Glutathione Naturally

Even though your body produces glutathione on it’s own, it’s usually not enough in cases of severe oxidation such as in adrenal fatigue, hormone imabalance, neurodegernative disease, and Hashimotos or general thyroid disease.

So what can you do on your own?

  • Increase your vitamin C – Vitamin C IVs for example help to increase levels of glutathione found in your white and red blood cells. For my patients I add glutathione to the IVs for an extra powerful boost of antioxidants!
  • Increase this Liver Herb – Milk thistle is a herbal supplement extracted from a plant called Silybum marianum. It contains three compounds, all of which are known for their strong antioxidant properties. But that is not all. Milk thistle is also known to increase the Glutathione levels in the body. So consider buying yourself a quality milk thistle supplement.
  • Avoiding Alcohol – if you drink excessive amounts of alcohol on a regular level this exposes you to a decrease in Glutathione levels, especially in your lungs, by 80 to 90%. So take a break from the vino or try decreasing the amount of martinis.

 

Regaining Control of your Thyroid

Navigating your thyroid issues can be overwhelming. Whether you’re trying to determine the underlying cause, making sure you’re eating enough of the right foods, or eliminating factors that wreak havoc on your thyroid.

Call me first. I’m here to help you…

Reinvent your relationship to food and your body, so that you can live inspired, doing the things you love, without worrying about your health.

I’ve been helping people with complex cases, like yours, in my Practice for years, very successfully!

How? Well it doesn’t involve medications or a radical change in your lifestyle. It just requires your trust in yourself as well as a small amount of time.

My Regenerative Health Program™ allows you to do what you need to do naturally, to get better for good! Yes you read that right.  This is because it’s all about balancing your body which include three fundamental areas. Your liver, your hormones, and your gut. That’s it.

keto diet and hypothyroidism hashimotos

 

The Regenerative Health Program is perfect for you if you:

Are committed to getting results.

Willing to be listened to and heard.

  Want to heal naturally.

 

If this is you, I welcome you to contact me here, to heal your thryoid.

Hypothyroidism and the Keto Diet

Hypothyroidism and the Keto Diet

Keto & Your Thyroid

Don’t Keto Your Thyro

 

Hypothyroidism in a Nut Shell

Hypothyroidism is when your thyroid gland does not produce enough thyroid hormone and this affects nearly every part of your body, including your metabolism, brain, heart, muscles, and skin. Without enough thyroid hormone (which is partially comprised of glucose molecules) all of your bodily processes slow down to a sluggish crawl (ugh). Research shows that women with autoimmune disease are more likely to develop hypothyroidism…which is even a heavier burden on the body.

 

How Your Adrenals are Involved

Your adrenals produce stress hormones, such as cortisol. When you experience stress, a cascade of stress hormones signals your body to slow down all processes that are unnecessary for overcoming the stressor in front of you, including thyroid hormone production. Chronic stress overworks your adrenals, which are unable to keep up with the constant demand for more and more stress hormones, inevitably leaving you in a state of adrenal fatigue…basically feeling tired all the time, no matter how many cups of coffee or scoops of maca you down!

 

How Keto Affects Your Adrenals & Thyroid

The core of ketogenic diet is to significantly reduce the intake of sugars and starches because these foods are broken down into glucose and insulin in the blood once we eat them. It was specifically created to mimic fasting or starvation from a metabolic perspective. However, ketosis can be a major strain on the adrenals. Reduced carb intake, leads to a decrease in thyroid hormone levels and an increase in cortisol—which decreases thyroid function further and means more work for your adrenals too.

But did you know caloric restriction lowers the concentration of T3 hormone? Yup! Here’s a recent study about exactly that. The primary reason why the lower calorie consumption decreases T3 is to improve the chances of survival when our ancestors, back in time, were dealing with food shortage. As a result, metabolism slows down, and the body burns fewer calories. The body is truly perfectly smart!

 

Hashimotos and Keto

The biggest problem with keto if you have Hashimotos is that the areas of the brain which regulate the function HPA (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal) axis needs glucose to work properly, and remember the adrenals respond poorly to a low caloric state too! To add fuel to the fire, severe carb restriction decreases T3 levels while increasing reverse T3.

 

Determining Which Diet Is Right For YOU

Every body is different, so it’s important to listen to your body and know what you do or do not tolerate. You may do perfectly fine on a keto diet, or you might find your body doesn’t respond well to it. Either way, if you have hypothyroidism and are looking to experiment don’t!

Call me first. I’m here to help you…

Reinvent your relationship to food and your body, so that you can live inspired, doing the things you love, without worrying about your health.

I’ve been helping people with complex cases, like yours, in my Practice for years, very successfully!

How? Well it doesn’t involve medications or a radical change in your lifestyle. It just requires your trust in yourself as well as a small amount of time.

My Regenerative Health Program™ allows you to do what you need to do naturally, to get better for good! Yes you read that right.  This is because it’s all about balancing your body which include three fundamental areas. Your liver, your hormones, and your gut. That’s it.

keto diet and hypothyroidism hashimotos

 

The Regenerative Health Program is perfect for you if you:

Are committed to getting results.

Willing to be listened to and heard.

 

Want to heal naturally.

 

If this is you, I welcome you to contact me here, to heal your thryoid.