Losing Weight Without the Keto Diet

Losing Weight Without the Keto Diet

Hello Everyone, welcome to Regnerate You™!

On this episode, I am speaking with Jenn Trepeck who is an Optimal Health Coach, Podcaster and Business Consultant who is the Founder of Better Life Now LLC. As a Health Coach, Jenn’s experience in health is one in which I find great similarities with, because she uses science to explain why the body does what it dose. And when it comes to weight loss, we all want to know more. So on today’s episode we dive into why Keto isn’t the ideal form of weight loss and what is actually going on with the body when it’s storing fat.

Jenn also explains her tips for ideal eating habits to balancing out hunger hormones with an easy “motto” to help you remember what to always include in your diet!

Jenn Trepeck

To find out more about Jenn:
Facebook: @JenniferTrepeck
Instagram: @JennTrepeck
Twitter: @JThappyhealthy
LinkedIn: @JenniferTrepeck

If you’re looking for additional advice, feel free to visit my blog here. You can also stay connected with me on my Facebook page @DrNirvanaHeals or on my Instagram @DrNirvana.

Please remember to subscribe and to please leave me a review as well!

And remember, when you regenerate, there’s a new you every day!

Remove These Toxic Fats

Remove These Toxic Fats

Welcome to Regenerate You™, I’m Dr. Nirvana!

On today’s episode of Regenerate You™, I discuss some of the worst fats that are hidden in every day foods and how you can avoid them. These fats contain another kind of fat that falls outside of the saturated and unsaturated categories which wreak havoc on your cells transforming your DNA! As of 1999, label laws in the United States don’t require food manufacturers to include detailed information about these fats in nutrition labeling. So, a product whose label says it’s low in fat (in general) necessarily won’t tell you the amount of the toxic damaging fats it does contain! Curious to know which fats I’m referring? Curious to know which fats I’m referring? I’ll discuss more about these fats, how they’re made toxic and what you can do to avoid them!

If you’re looking for additional advice, feel free to visit my blog here. You can also stay connected with me on my Facebook page @DrNirvanaHeals or on my Instagram @DrNirvana.

 

And remember, when you regenerate, there’s a new you every day!

Why Your Hormones Need Carbohydrates to Function

Why Your Hormones Need Carbohydrates to Function

Why Carbs are Good for Your Hormones

 

Low carb diets are all the rage right now in the nutrition and health world. And it’s true, cutting carbs can help with weight loss and health improvements for some people, mostly because of the caloric restriction.But for many people – women especially – keeping carbs too low for too long can have pretty unhealthy consequences, especially if you work out with any level of intensity. And even more so if you have hormone-related health issues like HPA axis dysregulation or hypothalamic amenorrhea, PCOS, hypothyroidism, adrenal fatigue and Hashimoto’s.

If you’re sedentary, your carb needs are generally lower than someone who is active. Those who don’t train regularly might be able to get away with less carbohydrates overall. And even if you do work out regularly, you probably won’t immediately feel the consequences when you first cut most carbs from your diet. It may take a few months to see the long-term impact, but at some point, you might start to feel spaced-out, sluggish, cranky and sick.

 

Low Carb Diet & Your Hormones

Eventually, restricting your carb intake too much can lead to many hormone-related issues such as:

  • decreased thyroid output (hypothyroidism)
  • increased cortisol output (abdominal fat)
  • decreased or increased testosterone (low libido and osteopenia)
  • impaired mood and cognitive function (brain fog)

If you already had a pre-existing hormone related condition before cutting carbs, such as hypothyroidism, PCOS, missed or irregular periods, or adrenal fatigue; eating too few carbs will only exacerbate your condition.  And if you’re under a lot of stress already, going too low carb can cause further HPA dysregulation and increase its symptoms.

Your carbohydrate intake is a critical part of the equation when it comes to balancing your sex hormones, losing weight, recovering from exercise, supporting your thyroid, boosting your energy, and so much more. You may be wondering how carbohydrates affect your adrenal health. Reducing carbohydrates excessively can affect stress hormone production in many people, usually causing a significant increase in cortisol. This will directly impact your energy levels causing them to plummet and eventually worsen pre-existing adrenal fatigue.

 

The Basic Chemistry of Blood Sugar

Any time we eat, our food is broken down into macronutrients, micronutrients, and water. This complex process allows us to derive energy from our food, obtain essential vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients, and collect the building blocks needed to make our immune cells, hormones, and neurotransmitters.

Carbohydrates are found in many different foods, and in different forms. After we eat, blood sugar rises as carbohydrates are digested and absorbed. This triggers the release of insulin, which helps shuttle glucose out of the bloodstream and into our cells. Insulin is considered an “anabolic hormone,” meaning it promotes the storage of glucose and the conversion of any excess into its long-term storage form: fat. We also have hormones that help us tap into stored glucose or generate more. This occurs when our blood sugar is low or when we have increased energy demands.

So, what does this mini biochemistry lesson have to do with adrenal fatigue?

As the name implies, adrenal fatigue involves a dysregulation in our body’s stress response. Initially this leads to elevated cortisol, a stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands. As adrenal fatigue progresses, the dysregulation often leads to low cortisol. Now here’s the catch: Low carbohydrate diets have also been shown to be a stressor on our adrenals.

 

Common Symptoms of Adrenal Fatigue

-Tend to be a “night person”
-Difficulty falling asleep
-Slow starter in the morning
-Tend to be keyed up, trouble calming down
-Calm on the outside, troubled on the inside
-Tendency to need sunglasses
–Chronic fatigue or get drowsy often
-Crave salty foods

Any time that you are not meeting your body’s needs for energy with adequate fuel, you put stress on your adrenals, since they act as your body’s shock absorbers (allowing your body to adapt to stress). This means that any caloric abuse or nutrition neglect is something that your adrenals have to make up for– by producing stress hormones (cortisol and adrenaline) to get you through the day. Usually, the more severe the adrenal dysfunction, the longer the adrenal stress has been going on.

Additionally, when you inadequately fuel your body, it stimulates the use of glycogen (stored sugar in the liver) for energy. Once your glycogen stores are depleted, tissue breakdown begins (the breakdown of proteins and fat to make glucose [sugar] for energy). This process of muscle catabolism releases amino acids such as cysteine, methionine, and tryptophan, which are all anti-metabolic to your thyroid. This happens because it’s the body’s way of being very intelligent,  by communicating with your thyroid, and telling it to turn down the conversion of active thyroid hormone in order to save your body from running itself into the ground.

 

How Many Carbs to Eat?

Here are my general starting points of the percentage of carbohydrates for hormone related health issues. But please keep in mind that your activity, stress, genetics and hormone imbalance will influence these recommendations:

  • For most women, I recommend a minimum of 25% of calories from carbs, particularly if you’re active.
  • For patients already dealing with an HPA Axis issue (“adrenal fatigue”), I start them at 30-40% calories from carbohydrates.
  • For women who are dealing with health issues surrounding fertility and hypothalamic amenorrhea, I recommend 40-50% of calories from carbs.

 

How do I  Know What MY Carb Needs May be?

In general, everybody has different dietary carbohydrate needs primarily depending on their activity levels and genetics, but also dependent on their age, gender, stage of life, and goals.

As I mentioned earlier, if you are sedentary you can likely eat fewer carbs and feel fine. However, if you regularly participate in intense, glucose-demanding activities like Crossfit, heavy powerlifting, and/or high-intensity interval training (HIIT), your body will begin to rely on stress hormones like cortisol to produce the glucose the brain and muscles need. When this happens, you may eventually develop symptoms associated with hormone related health conditions such as amenorrhea, hypothyroidism or adrenal fatigue.

 

Which Carbs are Best for YOU?

A hormone-supportive diet isn’t just about the quantity of carbohydrates. It’s also important to consider the quality of carbohydrates and the timing of when you’re eating them throughout the day. Choosing high fiber carbohydrates, such as those found in whole grains, legumes, and vegetables provide the essential nutrients needed to support proper hormone function. Also, the fiber in carbohydrates also helps slow the release of carbohydrates into the bloodstream, thus keeping blood sugar more stable. Whole grains are an incredible source of prebiotic fiber and have earned their rightful place in a diverse, healthy hormone based diet. They do this but maintaining your gut integrity, feeding your healthy probiotics foods they need to replicate and in turn create healthier hormones.

Another way to balance blood sugar is to make sure carbohydrates are paired with protein and/or fat at every meal and snack. Spacing carbohydrates out throughout the day is also important for adrenal function. This prevents blood sugar from dipping too low, which will also increase demand on the adrenals to release cortisol.

But to truly know which carbs are best for you, I’d recommend the Nirvana Diet™. I created this Diet to know exactly which foods, and in this case carbohydrates, you should be eating based upon your genetics. It takes the guess work out of knowing which foods are best for balancing your hormones!

The takeaway? Carbs are not the enemy. Eating quality carbs in balance with a whole food diet, can be supportive of all of your hormones in helping to regulate your body’s ability to stay balanced, happy, and regenerating stronger cells.

The Link Between Food Intolerance, Hormones and Your Gut Health

The Link Between Food Intolerance, Hormones and Your Gut Health

Welcome to Regenerate You!

If you find yourself struggling with food intolerances of any kind, then it’s most likely causing an imbalance in your hormones as well. And if you’ve been diagnosed with low testosterone, PCOSestrogen dominancethyroid issues, or insulin resistance; then your food sensitivities are making them worse.

In this Podcast, I discuss how they’re linked and where to begin to help heal and regenerate your body from the attack on your immune system.

If you’re looking for additional advice, feel free to visit my blog here. You can also stay connected with me on my Facebook page @DrNirvanaHeals or on my Instagram @DrNirvana.

Please subscribe and share this podcast to spread the health.

 

And remember, when you regenerate, there’s a new you every day!

Hidden Gluten Sources you Didn’t Know About

Uncommon Foods Containing Gluten

If you have Celiac Disease, an autoimmune disease that’s the most severe form of gluten intolerance, and are still experiencing symptoms after going gluten-free, you may still be getting gluten exposure from hidden sources. Both forms (Celiac’s and gluten intolerance) can cause widespread symptoms, many of which have nothing to do with digestion. They can both lead to further inflammation in the body as well as Hashimoto’s disease. However some people do have non-celiac gluten sensitivity as well. Either way it’s important to limit your exposure to gluten 100%. Here’s a comprehensive list the known and hidden sources of gluten, which will help you identify potential exposures that you weren’t aware of.

 

Common Gluten Foods:

  • Barley
  • Bulgur
  • Couscous
  • Kamut
  • Oats (if not specifically gluten-free)
  • Rye
  • Semolina
  • Spelt
  • Triticale
  • Wheat
  • Wheat germ

 

Hidden Gluten Sources:

  • Artificial coffee creamer
  • Beer
  • Bouillon cubes
  • Broth/stocks
  • Candy
  • Certain ground spices
  • Certain veined cheeses
  • Chewing gum
  • Chips
  • Cold cuts
  • Flavored teas
  • Flavored rice
  • Fish sticks
  • Flavored crackers
  • French fries
  • Gravies
  • Hot dogs
  • Imitation seafood
  • Instant coffee and other instant hot drinks
  • Ketchup
  • Matzo flavor
  • Mustard
  • Mayonnaise
  • Pasta side dishes
  • Rice mixes
  • Roasted nuts
  • Soy sauce
  • Salad dressing
  • Seitan (wheat gluten, used in meat substitutes)
  • Self-basting turkey
  • Soy and teriyaki sauces
  • Tinned baked beans
  • Tomato sauces
  • Vegetable cooking spray
  • Veggie burgers
  • Vodka
  • Wine coolers

For those with Celiac Disease, complete avoidance of gluten is important. Some non-Celiac patients may also be sensitive enough that even tiny exposures are problematic. If you feel like you have successfully eliminated gluten from your diet and are still experiencing gluten-associated symptoms. When you are gluten sensitive, your body is creating antibodies against gluten. Those same antibodies can also recognize proteins in other foods that have similar structures and mimic the reaction they have to gluten.  Which non-gluten foods you may react to will depend on the antibodies your body has formed against gluten.  Not everyone will have a cross-reaction to all the below foods, but it’s important to consider if you’ve gone gluten-free and are still experiencing symptoms.

 

Cross Reactive Foods:

  • Buckwheat
  • Sorghum
  • Millet
  • Amaranth
  • Quinoa
  • Corn
  • Rice
  • Potato
  • Hemp
  • Teff
  • Soy
  • Milk (Alpha-Casein, Beta-Casein, Casomorphin, Butyrophilin, Whey Protein and whole milk)
  • Chocolate
  • Yeast
  • Coffee (instant, latte, espresso, imported)
  • Sesame
  • Tapioca (a.k.a. cassava or yucca)
  • Eggs

In those with celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity, increased intestinal permeability or ‘leaky gut’ is common. This can further aggravate the formation of food sensitivities.  Healing an unhealthy gut may help alleviate some of these cross-reactions or sensitivities to gluten. However the best course of action would be to determine the root cause of your gut issues in the first place. 

 

Weight Loss in PCOS

Weight Loss in PCOS

Hello Everyone! Welcome to Regenerate You, I’m Dr. Nirvana. Today I wanted to discuss a very hot topic when it comes to PCOS and that’s weight loss.

One of the biggest struggles with women struggling with PCOS is losing weight or keeping it off. While diet can help to reduce weight, inevitably we return to square one with the weight coming back on.

On this episode, I’ll share which hormones are responsible for the weight gain, and the one change you can make in your diet to know exactly what to eat to help with your weight loss goals.

If you’re looking for additional advice, feel free to visit my blog here. You can also stay connected with me on my Facebook page @DrNirvanaHeals or on my Instagram @DrNirvana.

Please subscribe and share this podcast to spread the health!

 

And remember, when you regenerate, there’s a new you every day!