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Ever seen a reflexology chart, or an iridology chart?

The Chart Below Shows How Your Teeth Can Affect Your Health…

These show respectively that areas of the feet/hands and iris of the eye correspond to different parts of the entire body. There’s a colon chart that shows that same relationship – a matter of the microcosm reflecting the macrocosm. It should come as no surprise then that there are points within our jawbones – at specific tooth sites – that correspond to areas of the entire body, as well. Many holistic doctors call these points oral acupuncture points.

Experts say a vital relationship exists between your teeth and your sense organs, joints, spinal segments, vertebrae, organs and endocrine glands. Oral acupuncture points are related with the system of acupuncture meridians, or ‘energy highways’. When a particular acupuncture meridian becomes stressed, the corresponding oral acupuncture point(s) become sensitive to localized pressure.

Here’s what the link between teeth and the body looks like:

Your teeth aren’t just your teeth.

Look at the tooth in a specific region or area of the chart, not just the tooth itself. For example the lower first molar is connected to the stomach meridian. If it is the right molar the pancreas can be affected. The left molar could have an influence on the spleen.

So how does the infection of a tooth, which included the gum and bone around the tooth, affect the organ? Visualize this connection as an electrical circuit in your house.

With infection there is a disturbance in the energy or electrical circuit. The result is a pain in the tooth or a problem in the corresponding organ. If the circuitry is overloaded, the fuse gets blown. If it is not the fuse your electrician has to look further, the same is true with your dentist.

Specific Diseases Linked to Periodontal Disease:

Heart Attack and Stroke

Patients with periodontal disease are one and one-half to two times as likely to suffer a fatal heart attack and nearly three times as likely to suffer a stroke as those without periodontal disease. This association with heart disease is especially evident in patients under 50.

Bacterial Infection and Diabetes

It has been well established that diabetes predisposes patients to bacterial infections, including those affecting the oral cavity. Recent studies provide strong indications that periodontitis can make diabetes worse. Diabetics with severe periodontitis have greater difficulty maintaining normal blood-sugar levels. Treatment of periodontitis often leads to a reduced need for insulin.

Dental researchers now recommend that periodontal inflammation must be treated and eliminated in all diabetic patients, especially because this treatment may significantly reduce the risk of injury to the retina and arteries, which are also common consequences of diabetes.

Pneumonia and Other Respiratory Diseases

Pneumonia occurs when bacteria dwelling in the oral cavity and throat are inhaled into the lungs where immune system defenses fail to fight them. Some bacteria that cause pneumonia thrive in infected oral tissues of patients with periodontal disease.

On a side note…whenever a Dentist decides to work on your teeth, ask yourself what other areas of your health may need to be addressed first?

 

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